News & Media

News Results for SME Growth Index

 

Triple your Bs, double your Es and bring your A game

Mail & Guardian – February 27 – March 5, 2015

How does BBBEE actually impact small to medium-sized enterprises in SA?

The full article can be read by clicking on the link below:

http://mg.co.za/article/2015-02-27-00-triple-your-bs-double-your-es-and-bring-your-a-game

Jobs: Pushed to the wall

Financial Mail – 20 November 2014

Over the five years to 2013, small firms in SA have shed over 1m jobs. Most of these have been lower-paying jobs occupied by young people, but SA’s policy makers seem not to have noticed.

http://www.financialmail.co.za/features/2014/11/20/jobs-pushed-to-the-wall

 

New policies ‘should make it easier’ for job creation in South Africa

Business Day – 14 November 2014

SA’s new immigraton regulations as well as black empowerment regulations should make it easy for small companies to create jobs and contribute to the economy, American Chamber of Commerce board member Tim Schweikdert said yesterday

His comments support a recent report by the Johannesburg-based business environment specialists Small Business Project (SBP), which showed that small firms spent an average of eight working days a month dealing wth red tape. The report identifies taxes, labour and BEE issues as the most time-consuming factors.

To read the full article please follow the link below:

Regulations rob small businesses of one week every month, says report

Business Day Live- 11 November 2014

Reducing red tape will increase SMEs competitiveness, says new report

The findings are in the November small business report titled “Examining the challenges facing small businesses in SA”, by Johannsburg-based business environment specialists SBP.

To read the full article please follow the link below:

http://www.bdlive.co.za/business/2014/11/11/regulations-rob-small-businesses-of-one-week-every-month-says-report

Business Day, 10 November 2014 – Minister hopes small firms will create jobs

Five months after the creation of the Small Busness Deveopment Ministry, touted as a solution to SA’s unemployment problem, its effect is yet to be felt.

Statistics SA says 24,1% of South Africans are unemployed. The situation has been the catalyst for many people to venture into entrepreneurship.

The National Development Plan (NDP) envisages that SMEs will create 90% of the 11 million new jobs the government says can be created by 2030.

However, the broad impession of the business environment held by respondents to the February SME Growth Index was not positive – 71% said that it became harder to operatea business in SA last year. Only 9% said it had become easier.

Business_Day_10_Nov_2014_-_Minister_hopes_small_firms_will_create_jobs.pdf

Machines are willing workers at Sack’s nougat factory

All is not well at the bottom end of the business chain, despite the fact that the National Development Plan identifies this part of the economy as the best guarantor of growth and jobs. Sales are now starting to recover, but job growth remains stubbornly low.

In an auditorium at the Johannesburg Zoo, Neil Rankin, a Stellenbosch professor, reels off statistics that explain the “jobless growth” problem besetting small business in the country.

He is presenting the annual growth index for small businesses compiled by the Small Business Project (SBP).

The index is based on in-depth interviews with 500 small business operators and is the country’s chief source of detailed information on them.

The problems are many: for one thing, there are precious few new entrants into this sector of the economy with some three-quarters of the businesses at least 10 years old.

For another, 71% of those surveyed say that it had become “harder to operate a business” last year.

http://www.bdlive.co.za/business/2014/03/02/machines-are-willing-workers-at-sack-s-nougat-factory

What the budget means for SMEs

In the 2014 Budget, Minister Pravin Gordhan trod a prudent course between the demands of an election-year constituency and South Africa’s fiscal stability. Reiterating that the National Development Plan is the keystone of South Africa’s future, he also pressed the message that the country desperately needs improved economic growth.

The NDP envisages growth, particularly employment growth, powered by “small and expanding firms”. South Africa’s prospects are not linked merely to small and medium enterprises, but to SMEs able to grow successfully. So does the budget encourage their success?

The budget recognises the importance of SMEs to South Africa. It allocates billions to dedicated SME support, and more to stimulate selected sectors. It also notes criticism of the compliance burden across the economy. Tax matters receive particular attention. The turnover tax is to be simplified, and SARS will take “further steps to lower the cost of tax compliance in South Africa”.

http://www.politicsweb.co.za/politicsweb/view/politicsweb/en/page71654?oid=554649&sn=Detail&pid=71616

 

Small firms still battling red tape, skills shortages, survey shows

SMALL firms continue to battle a tangle of red tape and severe skills shortages, which are hampering their ability to grow and create jobs, and even threatening the survival of smaller financial services companies, a newly released survey shows.

More than two-thirds of the respondents said it had become harder to run a business in South Africa in 2013, according to the latest SBP SME Growth Index released on Wednesday.

Government policies emphasise the need for a thriving small and medium enterprise sector to create jobs and stimulate economic growth. South Africa’s economic roadmap, the National Development Plan, envisages that about 90% of jobs will be created in small and expanding companies by 2030.

http://www.bdlive.co.za/business/2014/02/20/small-firms-still-battling-red-tape-skills-shortages-survey-shows

 

Labour conditions primary obstacle to SME growth – SBP

Skills shortages and overly stringent labour regulations are harming the development of the SME sector in South Africa, according to the 2013 SME Growth Index, published by research specialists SBP.

15% of business owners said that a lack of skills was the greatest impediment to the growth of their firm, ahead of 12% who were overburdened by excessive regulation.

Business services firms most acutely felt skills shortages – 38% of firms felt that this was their greatest barrier to hiring more staff.

http://www.politicsweb.co.za/politicsweb/view/politicsweb/en/page71651?oid=548422&sn=Detail&pid=71651

 

SMEs spend eight working days a month dealing with red tape – survey.

South Africa’s stringent policy framework and legislation is proving more difficult for small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to grow, despite being identified as key engines for job creation by the government.

This is according to the findings of an SBP survey titled ‘Counting the cost of red tape for business in South Africa’ which was conducted in 2012, and features 500 SMEs in Cape Town, Durban and Johannesburg.

The survey notes that 2013 was a good year for SMEs in terms of turnover, with nearly two thirds of the sample noticing an average rise in turnover of 13%.

According to Neil Rankin, economics associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch, all the surveyed firms said it was harder to operate businesses in 2013 than 2012, with red tape being the source of contention.

http://www.moneyweb.co.za/moneyweb-mybusiness/south-africa-a-tough-climate-for-smes

 

Skills shortage, red tape hinder SMEs

The SME Growth Index is an annual research project aimed at establishing a solid, evidence-based understanding of the country’s SMEs. It was released by an independent private sector development and research company, SBP, specialising in improving the business environment.

The report paid particular attention to the factors impacting on company growth and linked the findings to an assessment of the country’s competitiveness. The report suggested the challenges of the difficult business environment appear to be driven mainly by domestic factors, as opposed to global conditions.

Professor Neil Rankin of the University of Stellenbosch and director at SBP said the SME sector was generally aging. Rankin added that year-on-year growth in output was diverse. “We have firms (40 percent) who are growing their turnover by 10 percent and we have 22 percent who are shrinking in turnover and a middle group who are stagnant or growing very slowly,” he said.

http://rosebankkillarneygazette.co.za/128623/skills-shortage-red-tape-hinder-smes/

SMES still frustrated by red tape (New Age)

http://www.gate5.co.za/read/26837/qv/20081253/131123172/22149/j

Top Tweets @smegrowthindex #SMEGI

https://twitter.com/smegrowthindex

Entrepreneurship plays a vital role in the development of democracy. It expands opportunity, unleashes individual initiatives, & cultivates independent citizens who have a stake in society. #SMEGI

For a country desperately needing economic growth, few goals can be as important as the growth of a strong SME community #SMEGI

The findings of the 2013 SME Growth Index point to a resilient but frustrated SME community #SMEGI

To enable growth & competitiveness, we need a clear – eyed, evidence – based understanding of our SME’s, of the hindrances that are holding back their growth, & of the opportunities that can further be exploited.#SMEGI

SME’S & the growth of individual small firms, is an indispensable element of SA’s hopes for the future. This will be possible only if SA strives constantly to raise it’s competitiveness. #SMEGI

Firm growth, it seems, is happening in spite of a difficult business climate, rather than as a response to a favourable one #SMEGI

Research Specialists SBP releases the third annual Small Business Survey

SBP is proud to announce the release of the 2013 SME Growth Index.

The SME Growth Index is a multi-year research project geared towards establishing a solid, evidence-based understanding of South Africa’s small and medium enterprises.

It is the largest, most comprehensive study of the sector ever undertaken in South Africa, and one of a few of its kind worldwide. The research is based on an annual survey that tracks the experiences of a panel of 500 established small firms in the manufacturing, business services and tourism sectors.

Nearly two-thirds of SMEs surveyed saw a rise in turnover in 2013, with a 13% average increase across the panel. This is marginally better than the increase of 9% recorded in 2012.

Despite rising sales, over 70% of panel members said that it was harder to operate a business in South Africa in 2013 than the previous year. The challenges are mainly to be found in the domestic environment, rather than global conditions. Business owners identified the top barriers to growth as lack of skills (15%), burdensome regulations (12%), lack of finance (10%) and the cost of labour (10%). Together, these five factors accounted for almost 60% of the panel’s responses.

Chris Darroll, CEO of SBP, said that the government’s current SME policy is at odds with the National Development Plan (NDP). “While the government’s current focus – stimulating start-ups and helping to carry them through their formative years – has an important place in an economic strategy, these young companies are unlikely to drive extensive job creation and meet the NDP’s employment goals. The research has consistently shown over its three years that older, more established and more sophisticated firms show a decidedly greater ability to create and sustain jobs.”

Small business employment remains static deespite growing revenue

The 2013 SME Growth Index, produced by research specialists SBP, reveals that older SMEs are less willing to add new jobs than younger firms, but create more jobs than younger firms when they do choose to expand.

Nearly two-thirds of SMEs saw a rise in turnover in 2013 – a 13% average increase across the panel, up from 9% recorded in 2012. Turnover growth was most evident among business services firms.

However, growth in turnover has not translated into job growth on a significant scale. Almost 50% of firms reported that they kept their staff numbers static in 2013. Eighteen percent reported staff cuts, while only a third grew their staff complement.  Manufacturing firms were the most likely to have shed jobs.

Nearly half the younger firms on the panel – in operation for two to five years – took on more employees in 2013, creating on average just under two new positions. Firms in operation for longer were less likely to have increased their staff numbers. However, where they did, they created substantially more new jobs per firm.

Among expanding firms, those in operation between five and ten years hired four new employees on average; those aged between ten and 20 years hired five; and those operating for more than 20 years employed six new staff members.

Chris Darroll, CEO of SBP, said that the results showed the importance of older SMEs as employment generators.  “Government could stimulate job creation in this sector by differentiating policy and support measures according to the age of the SME. The SME Growth Index has consistently shown that older, more established and more sophisticated firms show a decidedly greater ability to create and sustain jobs. Government’s current focus – stimulating start-ups and carrying them through their formative years – has an important place in an economic strategy, but is unlikely to drive extensive job creation and meet the NDP’s employment goals.“

The SME Growth Index is a multi-year research project geared towards establishing a solid, evidence-based understanding of South Africa’s small and medium enterprises.

It is the largest, most comprehensive study of the sector ever undertaken in South Africa, and one of a few of its kind worldwide. The research is based on an annual survey that tracks the experiences of a panel of 500 established small firms in the manufacturing, business services and tourism sectors.

Red tape is tying SMES in Knots

SMEs spent the equivalent of eight working days per month dealing with red tape in 2013, according to a study by research specialists, SBP.

The SME Growth Index 2013 revealed that SMEs spent an average of 75 hours a month dealing with red tape in 2013 – the equivalent of eight working days.

Business services firms spent considerably more time dealing with red tape than firms in the tourism and manufacturing sectors: 99 hours per month, with much of this additional time accounted for by requirements imposed by the Financial Services Board.

Sixty percent of business owners, across sectors, reported that red tape had increased in 2013, hampering the growth of business in South Africa. Over 70% of SMEs on the Index panel said that it was harder to operate a business in South Africa in 2013 than the previous year.

The majority of the business owners expressed concerns about frequent changes in the regulatory environment and the lack of easily accessible information – causing many to worry that they may be falling short on compliance requirements they are not even aware of.

SARS inefficiencies were identified as a major red tape burden. While SARS is efficient at collecting revenue, it is less efficient at paying refunds, resolving problems, and issuing tax clearance certificates. In one instance a business owner reported having to wait over a year for their objection with SARS to be resolved.

The Index also revealed that the time required to start a new business in South Africa is far greater than previous research had suggested. In sharp contrast to the findings of World Bank’s Doing Business Survey 2013, which reports that opening a business in South Africa takes 19 days, over half of the panellists that had opened other businesses in 2013 reported that it took 60 to 90 days to complete all the necessary administrative processes before they could open their new businesses.

The SME Growth Index is a multi-year research project geared towards establishing a solid, evidence-based understanding of South Africa’s small and medium enterprises.

It is the largest, most comprehensive study of the sector ever undertaken in South Africa, and one of a few of its kind worldwide. The research is based on an annual survey that tracks the experiences of a panel of 500 established small firms in the manufacturing, business services and tourism sectors.

Small businesses: access to finance not the problem 

Most small businesses are able to get access to finance when needed, according to the SME Growth Index 2013, produced by research specialists SBP.

Across the panel of 500 SMEs, 18% of all firms had applied for bank loans in the previous year, while 16% had applied for bank overdraft or credit facilities. The large majority of applicants were successful – well over two-thirds of overdraft and credit applications were granted in full, as were over 75% of loans. Only 13% of credit and overdraft applications and 10% of bank loan applications were rejected. An additional small minority refused the offers made because of unfavourable conditions.order flagyl

Only 3% of the panel said they had not applied for a bank loan, and 4% for overdraft or credit, because they expected to be rejected or felt they lacked the collateral.

The use of bank finance was most prevalent among larger and longer established firms on the panel. Tourism firms were less likely to access bank finance – these firms tend not only to be younger and smaller, but also to hold assets in the name of the owner, rather than the firm, reducing their collateral

Chris Darroll, CEO of SPB, said that most business owners report that there has been no deterioration in their ability to access finance in 2013. “It’s encouraging that almost 30% expect that their ability to access finance would improve in 2014. Their optimism is supported by the World Bank’s latest Doing Business report, which ranks South Africa among the top global performers in terms of access to credit. Similarly, the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor’s most recent report on South Africa reports that sufficient funding is available for SMEs, although it also notes that difficulties exist in gaining access to it. Our results demonstrate that ease of access differs significantly according to sector and age of firm. Any attempt to stimulate the SME community by improving access to finance needs to take careful account of these differences.“

The SME Growth Index is a multi-year research project geared towards establishing a solid, evidence-based understanding of South Africa’s small and medium enterprises.

It is the largest, most comprehensive study of the sector ever undertaken in South Africa, and one of a few of its kind worldwide. The research is based on an annual survey that tracks the experiences of a panel of 500 established small firms in the manufacturing, business services and tourism sectors.

Tragedy and farce of South Africa’s red-tape explosion

KARL Marx famously wrote that history repeats itself, first as tragedy and then as farce. Few in South Africa’s business community are natural disciples of Marx, but given South Africa’s tortuous business environment, one might find bemused agreement.

The tragedy is well known. About 7-million South Africans are either unemployed or discouraged from seeking work. Millions more suffer from poverty.

That this situation must be turned around is agreed, with the need for “jobs” looming large. To achieve this, South Africa needs more job creators. It needs more businesses and better growth prospects for those that already exist.inderal

http://www.bdlive.co.za/opinion/2013/09/12/tragedy-and-farce-of-south-africas-red-tape-explosion

SMMEs in dire straits

In 2011 SBP created an index to understand the small business environment. It surveys 500 established, small and medium-sized firms, employing between 10 and 49 people, across various sectors of the economy for a longitudinal study over an initial period of three years. The latest SME growth index released in February found that instead of growing, the SME sector was more concerned with just trying to survive.

It found that nearly three-quarters of respondents said running an SME had become more difficult in the past year because of a range of factors. The weak economy was a major complaint, but steep rises in administered prices and municipal accounts, uncertainty about the supply of services and the tumultuous political climate were also raised as problems. Labour laws were often mentioned as a constraint to hiring staff.

http://www.fm.co.za/fm/CoverStory/2013/06/13/smmes-in-dire-straits

Charting a new path for small business prosperity

A JOURNEY of a thousand miles begins with a single step, goes the adage. For more than 20 years, a thriving small-business community has been hailed as South Africa’s pathway to prosperity. Taking the first steps to get there has been difficult.

Mostly because it suggests an answer to unemployment, the importance of small business is widely acknowledged. This attraction is paradoxically part of South Africa’s problem. Focusing on the benefits small business can bring has defocused attention from what is needed to develop a strong small-business community.

http://www.bdlive.co.za/opinion/2013/07/31/charting-a-new-path-for-small-business-prosperity

 

Half-hatched law lays hawkers low

“There is no evidence to suggest that simply making a business apply for a licence will make all of those enforceable. Businesses who don’t want attention simply won’t apply for licences.”

Terence Corrigan, research director of the independent private sector research company SBP echoed Hill-Lewis’s opinion. “The most charitable description of this Bill is that it is ill-conceived,” he said.

Whatever the Bill might achieve, he said, would be “hopelessly disproportional” to the bureaucratic burden it would place on the private sector. “It’s like using a sledgehammer to kill a fly. And they haven’t identified the fly.”

Critics have expressed almost universal concern about the burden of bureaucracy entailed in the Bill. The proposed law would require all businesses, no matter how large or small, to apply for a licence and pay an application fee at the local municipality.

http://mg.co.za/article/2013-05-03-00-half-hatched-law-lays-hawkers-low

Licensing bill will sap life of small businesses

When we should be targeting the SME sector for growth and employment creation and ensuring a legislative and policy environment supportive of that, studies tell a of disturbing reality.

For example, the SBP SME Growth Index of 2012 asked in its survey whether it had become easier or harder to run an SME. The overall results were that South Africa had become less accommodating to SMEs.

A staggering 74% agreed that running an SME had become more difficult. A further 19% felt that conditions had not changed and only 6% felt that it was easier to operate an SME.

Added to this, the SME index stated that red tape consumed 4% of a company’s turnover.

Is it any wonder then that the total early-stage entrepreneurial activity is so low in South Africa? The failure rate of small businesses is already high, as reflected by statistics from the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission, which reveal that about 80% of all new small businesses fail within the first five years.

Reducing bureaucratic hurdles is one proven, short-term, quick-win intervention that could turn this tide. Sadly, the introduction of legislation such as this bill completely misses that point.

Business is not advocating illegal business operations and practices. The reality is that the bill poses a real threat by increasing more red tape and related costs, and legislators have not demonstrated its superiority over existing pieces of legislation aimed at curbing illegal practices.

Read More: http://www.bdlive.co.za/opinion/2013/04/28/licensing-bill-will-sap-life-of-small-businesses

 

The Big Business Bribery Bill 

In the sluggish economic climate of today, it is already a scary prospect to risk your career and savings on starting a new business, in large part because of the bureaucracy associated with it. According to the SME Growth Index, a third of all small businesses reported that their survival has been threatened in the last year. It estimates that the cost of red tape is on average about 4% of turnover, which, at the margin, is more than enough to turn tentative profitability into certain bankruptcy for a small business. It also notes that it hits small firms more than twice as hard as big companies. “Red tape is thus particularly regressive and hurts those firms that are most vulnerable the most,” the report’s authors write.

Three-quarters of surveyed businesses said it has become more difficult for them to do business over the last year, and while they cited numerous reasons, more than one in five pointed to red tape, regulation and the cost of doing business as impediments to growth.

Read More: http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2013-04-16-the-big-business-bribery-bill/#.UW5ONyutxy4

Thousands will be kicked out

 

More than 500000 jobs could be lost through proposed changes to labour law, according to an analysis undertaken for business.

The “least-worse-case” scenario would be a loss of about 285000 jobs, according to research carried out by SBP (The Small Business Project), an independent research company.

Read More: http://www.businesslive.co.za/southafrica/sa_markets/2012/07/28/thousands-will-be-kicked-out

‘Labour Bills need RIA’

Amendments to the Labour Relations Act and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act will see the loss of about 285 000 jobs, according to Business Unity SA (BUSA).

Presenting at the Parliamentary hearings on the proposed amendments yesterday, the association requested Parliament to conduct a regulatory impact assessment (RIA) before it passes the Bills.

Small Business Project conducted an RIA on behalf of BUSA and the assessment confirmed the loss of close to 300 000 jobs, as a result of the amendments.

 

Read More : http://www.itweb.co.za/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=57142:labour-bills-need-ria&catid=244

Labour law changes ‘will shed jobs’ in South Africa

Business has warned that the proposed amendments to labour laws will increase the cost of employment significantly, writes Lynley Donnelly.

Despite being bound up in negotiations for months, the proposed changes to a raft of South Africa’s labour laws are still receiving fierce opposition from business, which warned of drastic potential job losses if key amendment Bills go ahead.

The Labour Relations Amendment Bill and the Basic Conditions of Employment Amendment Bill are part of a suite of changes to labour laws that were first proposed in 2010 and have been under protracted negotiation in the National Economic and Development Labour Council (Nedlac) for about a year.

The Bills are now the subject of public hearings before Parliament’s portfolio committee on labour, which are set to continue next week.

A regulatory impact assessment done in December 2010 for the government warned that a number of the proposed amendments to the labour laws were highly problematic and could negatively affect employment.

Revised Bills were tabled following the Nedlac negotiations, but business continues to take issue with a number of aspects in them.

Greater protection
A second regulatory impact assessment, recently completed for Business Unity South Africa by SBP (The Small Business Project), an independent research company, said although the effect the amendments would have on job numbers was difficult to determine, it could “confidently be expected to amount to several hundred thousand [job losses]”.

The aim of reviewing the legislation is, in part, to provide greater protection to vulnerable workers.

According to the labour department, the focus of the amendments is to address what is now commonly referred to as the “phenomenon of labour-broking”, regulating contract work, strikes and lockouts, essential services, organisational rights and collective bargaining, among others.

Read more at        http://mg.co.za/article/2012-07-26-labour-law-changes-will-shed-jobs-in-south-africa

Regulations must be streamlined to promote business

June 26 2012 at 05:00am


Red tape regulations cost the economy R79 billion a year. At least that was the case in 2004, when the government launched a pilot project on regulatory impact assessments for new regulations.

More recently, the World Bank placed South Africa at 34th in “ease of doing business”, but 91st on registering property and 75th in dealing with construction permits (infrastructure development, anyone?). And a Grant Thornton survey of business leaders in Gauteng in January found that red tape was now the biggest single obstacle to doing business in the province.

For small business the impact is worse, largely because they do not have full-time compliance departments. Estimates show compliance costs of 0.2 percent on average for big business, versus 8.3 percent for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This was underscored by SBP’s SME Centre report in November last year, which surveyed the impact of regulatory requirements on 500 SMEs.

http://www.iol.co.za/business/business-news/regulations-must-be-streamlined-to-promote-business-1.1327427#.T-mlOXDNA7A

 

CHRIS DARROLL: Factory sector’s decline can be reversed

Much of what is undermining the manufacturing sector could be ameliorated by policy and administrative reform.
WITH concern about unemployment in SA verging on desperation, there is a clear understanding across the board that something needs to be done differently. And while that “something” is up for debate, two concepts arise repeatedly in policy thinking: small business and manufacturing.

http://www.businessday.co.za/articles/Content.aspx?id=172468

 

JPMorgan Chase & Co. :

SME Catalyst for Growth in South Africa

The economic slowdown has had a negative impact on business growth, with 40 percent of businesses surveyed for the SBP “SME growth Index 2011” highlighting this as the primary barrier to growth.
This shows that businesses are unable to deal with natural market competition by finding defensible niche markets and products. The economic slowdown has had a negative impact on business growth, with 40 percent of businesses surveyed for the SBP “SME growth Index 2011” highlighting this as the primary barrier to growth.

http://www.4-traders.com/JPMORGAN-CHASE-CO-4831/news/JPMORGAN-CHASE-CO-SME-Catalyst-for-Growth-in-South-Africa

Entrepreneurs ‘ageing and dying’

South Africa’s factory owners are a dying breed. New research likely to give grey hairs to anyone hoping for the reindustrialisation of South Africa paints a picture of a rapidly ageing community fast giving up hope of selling its factories once its members retire because of the dwindling number of buyers willing to take on the difficult life of a factory owner.

http://mg.co.za/article/2011-12-02-entrepreneurs-ageing-and-dying/

SMEs in state of decline: SBP

The current stock of SMEs is finite and declining, according to Chris Darroll of research specialists SBP.

http://news.howzit.msn.com/smes-in-state-of-decline-sbp

Wet stuit klein sake

Johannesburg. – Baie klein en middelslagondernemings (KMO’s) is positief oor die toekoms en is van plan om te groei en meer mense aan te stel. Die werklikheid is egter dat die meeste van hulle nié in die afgelope paar jaar nuwe werkgeleenthede geskep het nie.

http://www.sake24.com/Maatskappye/Beleggingsbeheer/Wet-stuit-klein-sake-20111123

Why are South Africa’s SMEs struggling to grow employment?

South Africa is squandering a critical economic asset and source ofjob creation by failing to create an environment for the small and medium enterprise sector to flourish. But the good news is that this can be remedied. This is the key message to emerge from the 2011 SME GrowthIndex, produced by research specialists SBP.

http://www.supermarket.co.za/news_articles.asp?ID=3326

Labour laws, empowerment hurt SMEs

South Africa’s labour laws, inflexible labour legislation and the country’s broad-based black economic empowerment are contributing to the failure of small and medium enterprises according to Fin24..

http://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/591/67623.html

Small businesses not growing quickly enough

SOUTH Africa’s small, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) are not growing at the pace required for large-scale wealth and job creation, a new study published this week has revealed.

http://www.iol.co.za/business/business-news/small-businesses-not-growing-quickly-enough-1.1185214

Labour laws hamper businesses

Inflexible labour legislation and black economic empowerment are frustrating small business growth, according to an index released yesterday.

http://www.citizen.co.za/citizen/content/en/citizen/business-news?oid=241511&sn=Detail&pid=146848&Labour-laws-hamper-businesses

SBP releases results of SME Growth Index

Why are South Africa’s SMEs struggling to grow employment?

South Africa is squandering a critical economic asset and source of job creation by failing to create an environment for the small and medium enterprise sector to flourish. But the good news is that this can be remedied. This is the key message to emerge from the 2011 SME Growth Index, produced by research specialists SBP.

http://www.insurancegateway.co.za/ShorttermProfessionals/PressRoom/ViewPress/Irn=4546&URL=SBP+releases+results+of+SME+Growth+Index

Labour laws, BEE hamper small business

Inflexible labour legislation and black economic empowerment are frustrating small business growth, according to an index released on Tuesday.

“Major regulatory barriers identified by the index are inflexible labour laws, broad-based black economic empowerment (BBBEE) and Sars [SA Revenue Service] inefficiencies,” said Chris Darroll, CEO of SBP, the research company which compiled the index.

http://www.thenewage.co.za/35816-9-53-Labour_laws,_BEE_hamper_small_business

Labour laws, BEE hamper small business

Inflexible labour legislation and black economic empowerment are frustrating small business growth, according to an index released on Tuesday.

“Major regulatory barriers identified by the index are inflexible labour laws, broad-based black economic empowerment (BBBEE) and Sars [SA Revenue Service] inefficiencies,” said Chris Darroll, CEO of SBP, the research company which compiled the index.

http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/article/labour-laws-bee-hamper-small-business-2011-11-22

Labour laws, BEE hamper small business

Inflexible labour legislation and black economic empowerment are frustrating small business growth, according to an index released on Tuesday.

“Major regulatory barriers identified by the index are inflexible labour laws, broad-based black economic empowerment (BBBEE) and Sars [SA Revenue Service] inefficiencies,” said Chris Darroll, CEO of SBP, the research company which compiled the index.

http://www.citizen.co.za/citizen/content/en/citizen/local-news?oid=241467&sn=Detail&pid=40&Labour-laws–BEE-hamper-small-business

SMEs in state of decline: SBP

The current stock of SMEs (small and medium enterprises) is finite and declining, according to Chris Darroll of research specialists SBP.

http://www.businesslive.co.za/businessexchange/2011/11/22/smes-in-state-of-decline-sbp

Labour laws, BEE hamper small business

Inflexible labour legislation and black economic empowerment are frustrating small business growth, according to an index released on Tuesday.

“Major regulatory barriers identified by the index are inflexible labour laws, broad-based black economic empowerment (BBBEE) and Sars [SA Revenue Service] inefficiencies,” said Chris Darroll, CEO of SBP, the research company which compiled the index.

http://www.polity.org.za/article/labour-laws-bee-hamper-small-business-2011-11-22

Labour laws, BEE hamper small business

Inflexible labour legislation and black economic empowerment are frustrating small business growth, according to an index released on Tuesday.

“Major regulatory barriers identified by the index are inflexible labour laws, broad-based black economic empowerment (BBBEE) and Sars [SA Revenue Service] inefficiencies,” said Chris Darroll, CEO of SBP, the research company which compiled the index.

http://www.fin24.com/Economy/Labour-laws-BEE-hamper-small-firms-20111122

 

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